2016 Validated Data

Graphs and Charts supplied by Arbor Education Partners

The Pupil Premium

 

The Pupil Premium is an allocation of additional funding provided to schools to support specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement. These include pupils who are entitled to free school meals, those looked after by the local authority and children of armed service personnel. The intended effect of this funding is to accelerate progress and raise attainment.

In most cases the Pupil Premium is allocated to schools and is clearly identifiable. It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per FSM (Free School Meal) pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.

All schools are required to report on the amount of funding received, how this is being used, and the impact of any work done.

 

The funding we receive is used in the following ways:

 

  • To provide intervention programmes for underachieving pupils and those with SEN (Special Educational Needs). 
  • To provide early intervention for children in danger of falling behind.
  • To employ additional support staff to help provide a targeted level of support to some of our most vulnerable children so they can make the progress expected of them, particularly in Reading, Writing and Maths.  Sometimes, the additional staff who are employed in school to support our disadvantaged pupils will also work with non-disadvantaged pupils.  This is often due to how the class groups are organised and will be for all students' benefit; at Lower Kersal we are keen to ensure that those not in receipt of the PPG do not themselves fall behind due to a lack of support and intervention.
  • To provide one-to-one tuition and/or speech and language therapy for some pupils.
  • To incentivise pupils to come to school and achieve good levels of progress (eg special trips out, small prizes, work in the radio room etc)
  • To provide short term intervention programmes for under achieving pupils and those with SEN so our most vulnerable children can make the progress expected of them and to also help many exceed the progress expected of them.
  • Ensuring that the qualifying children - as all others - have their needs clearly identified and their progress closely monitored through the school
  • To subsidise educational visits and provide them with a wider range of opportunity and experiences. For some children this has a huge impact on their self-esteem and confidence.
  • To ensure that all children are able to start the school year with a new school jumper and reading book bag.
  • To provide bespoke support for some pupils in times of crisis or need (eg payment of breakfast club fees, entrance exams, out of school activities etc.)
  • Employment of second Educational Psychologist to work specifically for the children in receipt of the PPG. 

 

All matters regarding the use of Pupil Premium funds are treated with discretion and in confidence.  Bespoke support often comes from approaches by ouor school's Children and Families Officer.

Identified Barriers To Learning

The main barriers to educational achievement at Lower Kersal are:

  • Low levels of speaking and listening skills for a majority of children.
  • Lack of engagement by some parents.
  • Many children have a lack of experiences e.g. visits to different places.
  • Lack of aspiration – few children have close experience of university and a wide range of careers.
  • Low attendance or persistent absenteeism

Plans for the 2016 - 2017 Pupil Premium Grant

Brief Description of Project & Rationale

Funding Amount

Intended Outcome

 

Speaking & Listening skills are low for the majority of children.

 

Response:

Provide Speech & Language teacher 1.5 days per week to work in EYFS

£13,500

Number of referrals to SaLT reduces from Yr 1 onwards.  Pupils in EYFS are able to speak more clearly, positively impacting on their reading and writing work.  Results in Expressive Arts & Design (EAD) increases and pupils converse freely and confidently with their peers and other adults.

 

 

Pupils lack aspiration and levels of engagement with adults are low, particularly in class.

 

RESPONSE:

Four support staff employed to work in EYFS, KS1 and lower KS2 to help improve standards and enhance provision.

£51,736

Data shows that attainment across all key stages is consistent, ensuring that all pupils make expected progress in R,W and Ma in all year groups.  School also needs to focus on securing GREATER DEPTH of standards.  These support staff will work with all pupils in their class and will lead interventions for identified pupils.  These small group numbers may be increased with the addition of one or two children not in receipt of the PPG but in danger of falling behind.

 

Many pupils begin to fall behind due to a lack of support at home or poor absence levels.  We need them to catch up or keep uo with their peers.

 

RESPONSE:

Subscription to KS2 PiXL Programme and employment of TA to deliver therapies.  School to identify Raising Standards Lead and deliver support to identified pupils both within, and external to, normal classroom lessons.

£19,549

 

 

Vulnerable pupils in danger of falling behind or in danger of not making AT LEAST expected progress achieve levels expected of them. 

 

 

Some pupils cannot access learning in chool due to barriers at home or problems in their own personal life.

 

RESPONSE:

School to support families financially to allow their children to attend a range of trips, visits and special events including two residential trips in Yr 5 and Yr 6.  School will also help pay for school jumpers for any family struggling to find the money for this.

£18,000

Families are not charged for any trips, visits or special events. EVERY child in school benefits from this approach.  School does not rely on donations from parents to run these, hence they are not cancelled and are guaranteed to take place helping enhance the curriculum and broaden childrens life experiences.  Children who may not have had a chance to go on the trips previously due to financial difficulties can attend without prejudice.  Every child in school will feel part of a community through the use of a shared uniform – no child will stand out due to financial problems at home.

 

Many children do not have books at home.  Books we have in school are often tatty and in a poor condition.  This impacts on childrens' desire to take them home and on parents eagerness to listen to children read.  A lack of books at home also means that children often do not have storytime or opportunities to have texts read to them

 

RESPONSE:

Development of NEW reading scheme, reading at home  and home-school support for EYFS, with focus on deepening reading skills to help secure exceeding standards.  School to run another FRED scheme, purchasing books to read at home and as rewards at this age range.  Increased number of 'core reading books' in KS1 will allow more children to take books home and read with their parents.   Parent workshops to be held in local library and parents encouraged to sign up their child; visits by authors for story-telling sessions (including POETS), and a visit by theatre groups performing shows to link with focus books will be arranged.

£10,000

 

 

More children read at home with their parents.  They are active members of their local library.  Books are taken home and brought back on a regular basis with a higher percentage of fathers/male role models involved in listening to their children read at home.  Children have a love of books and of the printed text.  Children actively choose books they enjoy and can talk about the types of books they like to read and are eager to share their books with other adults and children. More parents are involved in the learning of their child; they know how they can support them at home to secure further standards

 

Many pupils begin to fall behind due to a lack of support at home or poor absence levels.  We need them to catch up or keep uo with their peers.

 

RESPONSE:

Study Support, 1 to 1 tuition sessions and booster groups to take place in KS1 and KS2. Support staff and agency staff used to ensure a programme of after-school support takes place across the whole of the academic year.  Rewards, prizes, incentives and certificates purchased to motivate and engage pupils even further.

 

£20,000

 

All resources are used effectively to ensure that identified children make at least expected progress in R, W and Maths, with a high percentage of them (over 50%) making better than expected progress as a result of the interventions put in place for them and the incentives offered to them as part of their work. 

 

Some pupls are unable to work at home due to a lack of resources.  Parenst who d want to support their children often find it too expensive to purchase the materials required.

 

RESPONSE:

Purchase of home study and revision support packs for Year 6 pupils, along with CDROM to support Maths.

Parent workshops invite parents into school to learn how to use the materials effectively

 

£3,000

 

Parents work with their child at home, helping secure greater progress and raising attainment.

Parents feel supported in their own ability to work with their child at home.

 

Some children have low aspirations due to a lack of experience and knowledge fo the wider world. Attendance levels are often low due to a lack of aspiration from the parent.  We need children to want to come to school in order for them to convince parents to bring them each day.

 

RESPONSE:

Arrangement of special incentive days to promote pupil thirst for progress and greater attainment, including animation workshops, archery lessons and circus days.  Work will be linked to literacy follow-ups

£2,000

 

Children show self-motivation to learn and do well; this is rewarded by their attendance at a special event or activity.  These activities have been chosen as things children would not normally have access to.

 

We need to ensure that our PPG allocation is being spent correctly.  We need to continue to devleop and challenge our teachers in our drive for educational excellence.

 

RESPONSE:

Release time for teachers to meet with SLT and stakeholders to discuss pupil progress for FSM6 pupils; three times per year.  Half-termly meeting costs to be met by school.

Staff to work with other staff within EIP Cluster and to also take part in peer teaching and coaching models

£10,000

SLT, stakeholders and teachers meet to focus on attainment and progress of FSM6 pupils.  Pupils are discussed individually and actions agreed to maximise impact.  As a result of this work the attainment and progress of pupils in receipt of the PPG increases and accelerates. As a result f the work on improving outcomes for those in receipt of the PPG, there is also a noticeable impact on other pupil groups too.

 

Our children respond diffierently to a range of teaching styles and classroom groups, Extra staff ensure that children can be taught in different ways and in smaller groups.

 

RESPONSE:

Part time support from 0.5 teachers to work in Y2 and Y6 (5/12 of school year)

 

£42,000

Increased standards in reading, writing and maths at the end of KS1 and KS2 - particularly at exceeding levels for KS1.

 

TOTAL COST OF OUTLINED PROJECTS

£189,785

 

Pupil Premium Allocation for 2016 - 2017

 

   £188,523

 

 

Please note: School is keen to ensure that the differences between those in receipt of the PPG and not in receipt of thr PPG does not grow.  We do not feel that there is any reason for any difference in performance between these two groups. School is now making plans to positively support those children who are not in recept of the PPG.  In 2016, 6 pupils not in receipt of the PPG were included within 6 existing PPG interventions.  Impact of this work was positive as they also achieved the standards expected of them.  We feel that this was a justifiable spend of a very small portion of the Pupil Premium Grant.

                                      Next PPG Strategy Meeting : 10.7.2017

Download our PPG spending plan and PPG statements for 2016-17 here
The Pupil Premium At Lower Kersal 2016-1[...]
Microsoft Word document [271.6 KB]

DETAILS OF PREVIOUS PUPIL PREMIUM SPEND AND IMPACT REPORTS

DETAILS OF PUPIL PREMIUM SPEND FOR 2015 - 2016

Brief Description of Project

Funding Amount

Intended Outcome

 

Provide Speech & Language teacher 1.5 days per week to work in EYFS

£13,500

Number of referrals to SaLT reduces from Yr 1 onwards.  Pupils in EYFS are able to speak more clearly, positively impacting on their reading and writing work.  Results in Expressive Arts & Design (EAD) increases and pupils converse freely and confidently with their peers and other adults.

Teacher in Year 5 and Year 6 two days per week to improve reading, grammar, spelling and punctuation levels.  Teacher to support provision for ERiC/Class reading through advice and ordering of resources/class reads.  Teacher to work with Year 3, Year 4 and Year 5 from May 2016 onwards.

£16,400

 

Standards in GPS and Reading improve in Yr 5 and Yr 6.  ERiC takes place in all classes.  School has a good selection of class reads and guided reading materials.  Standards in GPS are improved at accelerated rate following on from input of additional teacher for .75 of Summer Term.

 

Teacher employed on .5 contract to work with KS1, improving reading, maths and writing standards.

£27,612

Standards in reading rises in all KS1 classes.  Number of pupils passing Yr 1 phonics screening check increases for 2016.  Number of children leaving at, or above age-related expectations in R and W increases and is in line with national averages.

Teacher employed on .5 contract to work with KS1, improving standards in maths

£27,612

Standards in maths rises in all KS1 classes.   Number of children leaving at, or above age-related expectations Maths increases and is in line with national averages.

Three support staff employed to work in EYFS, KS1 and lower KS2 to help improve standards and enhance provision.

£38,802

Data shows that attainment across all key stages is consistent, ensuring that all pupils make expected progress in R,W and Ma in all year groups.

Subscription to KS2 PiXL Programme and employment of TA to deliver therapies.  School to identify Raising Standards Lead and deliver support to identified pupils both within, and external to, normal classroom lessons.

£19,549

 

 

Vulnerable pupils in danger of falling behind or in danger of not making AT LEAST expected progress achieve levels expected of them. 

 

 

School to support families financially to allow their children to attend a range of trips, visits and special events including two residential trips in Yr 5 and Yr 6.  School will also help pay for school jumpers for any family struggling to find the money for this.

£14,000

Families are not charged for any trips, visits or special events.  School does not rely on donations from parents to run these, hence they are not cancelled and are guaranteed to take place helping enhance the curriculum and broaden childrens life experiences.  Children who may not have had a chance to go on the trips previously due to financial difficulties can attend without prejudice.  Every child in school will feel part of a community through the use of a shared uniform – no child will stand out due to financial problems at home.

Development of reading scheme, reading at home  and home-school support for EYFS.  School to organise and run its own FRED scheme, purchasing books to read at home and as rewards at this age range.  Increased number of 'core reading books' in EYFS will allow more children to take books home and read with their parents.   Book and Story bags purchased to extend current lending system.  Parents invited into school to share writing lessons with EYFS pupils; weekly input to help parents support their child at home.  Parent workshops to be held in local library and parents encouraged to sign up their child; visits by authors for story-telling sessions, and a visit by theatre groups performing shows to link with focus books will be arranged.

£10,000

 

 

More children read at home with their parents.  They are active members of their local library.  Books are taken home and brought back on a regular basis with a higher percentage of fathers/male role models involved in listening to their children read at home.  Children have a love of books and of the printed text.  Children actively choose books they enjoy and can talk about they types of books they like to read and are eager to share their books with other adults and children. More parents are involved in the learning of their child; they know how they can support them at home to secure further standards

Study Support, 1 to 1 tuition sessions and booster groups to take place in KS1 and KS2. Support staff and agency staff used to ensure a programme of after-school support takes place across the whole of the academic year.  Rewards, prizes, incentives and certificates purchased to motivate and engage pupils even further.

 

£20,000

 

All resources are used effectively to ensure that identified children make at least expected progress in R, W and Maths, with a high percentage of them (over 50%) making better than expected progress as a result of the interventions put in place for them and the incentives offered to them as part of their work. 

Purchase of home study and revision support packs for Year 6 pupils, along with CDROM to support Maths.

Parent workshops invite parents into school to learn how to use the materials effectively

 

£3,000

 

Parents work with their child at home, helping secure greater progress and raising attainment.

Parents feel supported in their own ability to work with their child at home.

School to purchase bank of refurbished laptops for children to use at home to help support learning taking place in school.  Software and licences to run these laptops will be purchased  

£4,000

Children use technology to support their learning at home.  Children are all able to complete tasks set on computers irrespective of financial background.  Pupils progress and attainment increases.

Arrangement of special incentive days to promote pupil thirst for progress and greater attainment, including animation workshops, archery lessons and circus days.  Work will be linked to literacy follow-ups

£2,000

 

Children show self-motivation to learn and do well; this is rewarded by their attendance at a special event or activity.  These activities have been chosen as things children would not normally have access to.

Release time for teachers to meet with SLT and stakeholders to discuss pupil progress for FSM6 pupils; three times per year.  Half-termly meeting costs to be met by school.

£5,400

SLT, stakeholders and teachers meet to focus on attainment and progress of FSM6 pupils.  Pupils are discussed individually and actions agreed to maximise impact.  As a result of this work the attainment and progress of pupils in receipt of the PPG increases and accelerates.

 

TOTAL COST OF OUTLINED PROJECTS

£201,875

 

Pupil Premium Allocation for 2015 - 2016

£200,478

 

 

You can download a copy of this planned spend below:

Planned PPG Spend for 2015.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [251.2 KB]

THE IMPACT OF OUR PUPIL PREMIUM SPEND 2015 - 2016

IMPACT PERFORMANCE GRAPHS FOR DISADVANTAGED PUPILS, 2016
PPG Impact Graphs 2016.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [1.7 MB]

IMPACT OF OUR PUPIL PREMIUM SPEND 2014-2015

Comments On Our Validated Data Performance for 2015 On Those Pupils In Receipt Of The Pupil Premium At Lower Kersal Primary School:

"The Core Subjects Value Added score amongst Pupil Premium students is 1.3 points greater than the non-Pupil Premium students average, and 5.0 points greater than the national Pupil Premium students average. The school gap has improved by 1.0 points from 2 years ago.​"

"The proportion of Pupil Premium students at Lower Kersal achieving Level 5 in Reading, Writing and Maths is 32.0% greater than the non-Pupil Premium students average, and 30.0% greater than the national Pupil Premium students average. The school gap has improved by 65.0% from 2 years ago.​"

Comments prepared by ARBOR

Progress:

Attainment:

Comments prepared by ARBOR for Lower Kersal Primary School

Please download this PDF document. It details all of the impact information above!
Pupil Premium PROGRESS and ATTAINMENT 20[...]
Adobe Acrobat document [888.9 KB]

DETAILS OF PUPIL PREMIUM SPEND FOR 2014 - 2015

 

Brief Description of Project Funding Amount Intended Outcome
Provide Speech & Language teacher 1.5 days per week to work in EYFS £13,500 Number of referrals to SaLT reduces from Yr 1 onwards.  Pupils in EYFS are able to speak more clearly, positively impacting on their reading and writing work.
Teacher in Year 5 and Year 6 two days per week to improve reading, grammar, spelling and punctuation levels.  Teacher to support provision for ERiC/Class reading through advice and ordering of resources/class reads.  Teacher to work with Year 4 and Year 5 from May 2015 onwards. £16,400 Standards in GPS and Reading improve in Yr 5 and Yr 6.  ERiC takes place in all classes.  School has a good selection of class reads and guided reading materials.  Standards in GPS are improved at accelerated rate following on from input of additional teacher for .75 of Summer Term.
Teacher employed on .5 contract to work with KS1, improving reading and writing standards. £27,612 Standards in reading rises in all KS1 classes.  Number of pupils passing Yr 1 phonics screening check increases for 2015.  Number of children leaving Year 2 with L2B+ in R and W increases, with more evidence of pupils attaining L3 in these areas.
Three support staff employed to work in EYFS, KS1 and KS2 to help improve standards and enhance provision. £38,802 Data shows that attainment across all key stages is consistent, ensuring that all pupils make expected progress in R,W and Ma in all year groups.
Subscription to KS2 PiXL Programme and employment of TA to deliver therapies.  School to identify Raising Standards Lead and deliver support to identified pupils both within, and external to, normal classroom lessons. £19,549 Vulnerable pupils in danger of falling behind or in danger of not making AT LEAST expected progress achieve levels expected of them. 
School to support families financially to allow their children to attend a range of trips, visits and special events including two residential trips in Yr 5 and Yr 6. £14,000 Families are not charged for any trips, visits or special events.  School does not rely on donations from parents to run these, hence they are not cancelled and are guaranteed to take place helping enhance the curriculum and broaden childrens life experiences.  Children who may not have had a chance to go on the trips previously due to financial difficulties can attend without prejudice.
Development of reading scheme and reading at home.  School to organise and run its own FRED scheme, purchasing books to read at home and as rewards.  Increased number of 'core reading books' at all key stages to allow more children to take books home and read with their parents.  School to purchase netbooks and subscribe to word shark scheme to increase participation of parents at home with their child's reading.  Book and Story bags increased in EYFS to extend current lending system. £10,000 More children read at home with thier parents.  They are active members of their local library.  Books are taken home and brought back on a regular basis with a higher percentage of fathers/male role models involved in listening to their children read at home.  Children have a love of books and of the printed text.  Children lower down the school actively choose books they enjoy and can talk about they types of books they like to read and are eager to share their books with other adults and children.
Study Support, 1 to 1 tuition sessions and booster groups to take place in KS1 and KS2. Support staff and agency staff used to ensure a programme of after-school support takes place across the whole of the academic year.  Rewards, prizes, incentives and certificates purchased to motivate and engage pupils even further. £25,000 All resources are used effectively to ensure that identified children make at least expected progress in R, W and Maths, with a high percentage of them (over 50%) making better than expected progress as a result of the interventions put in place for them and the incentives offered to them as part of their work. 

TOTAL COST OF OUTLINED PROJECTS

  £168,345
Pupil Premium Allocation for 2014 - 2015   £168,300

The Impact of the Pupil Premium at Lower Kersal Primary School 2012 - 2014

The diagram above shows that no groups in school makes significantly less progress than expected (ie no red bars), however school has high expectations of itself and its pupils and has said that it needs to improve on the progress of its girls as this is the weakest performing group. School is currently looking at its curriculum to see if its writing and mathematics lessons are sufficiently engaging to girls. School is also analysing how well the Pupil Premium is being used to further accelerate the progress of eligible pupils.

2013-14 Pupil Premium Grant Overview

 

PUPIL PREMIUM ALLOCATION FOR 2013-2014:   £119,700

SaLT (one day per week) : £9000

Yr 5/Yr 6 teacher for reading and grammar work: £16,400

KS1 support teacher: £27,612

Children and Families Development Officer (AYR difference): £3,282

EYFS TA: £13,581

KS1 TA: £15,549

Trips, visits & holiday clubs : £6000

School uniform support : £1000

Reading books /Phonic & Comprehension support : £3000

Playground and Provision Development : £11000

Study Support : £5000

One to one tuition / Booster Groups: £9000

ACTUAL AMOUNT SPENT : £120,424

 

Impact of the use of our pupil premium spend for 2013-14 can be seen in the standards outlined on our standards page for 2014.  As the diagram above clearly shows, no groups make significantly less progress than expected, evidencing our effective use of this important funding stream. Further analysis to show comparisons between those eligible for the PP and those who do not receive this funding will be published here once our school's Raise Online Report is available.

This image shows a good picture of the success of the school’s work in narrowing the gap between disadvantaged pupils and others nationally.